decolonize-science-university-of-cape-town-uctIn a recent video that has been shared on various social media platforms, a number of University of Cape Town students and staff members are seen to engage in what may at first seem is, wishfully, satire. Unfortunately, within a number of seconds, one realizes that the vitriol is, in fact, said dead seriously and straight-faced.

Without touching on the situation regarding our South African campuses and the merits, or lack thereof, of the #FeesMustFall movement, one feels obliged to respond to the ludicrous suggestions that are made in the above-mentioned video. The video starts with a young student stating that she expected to be confronted with the question of how she believes science should be ‘decolonized’. Thereafter follows an attempt to argue for such ‘decolonization’. The fallist student anecdotally substantiates her stance by rhetorically asking how witchcraft in KwaZulu-Natal could be explained. Unfortunately, the talks about shooting lightning from your fingers was not a Star Wars reference.

To say that science is wholly the product of Western modernity is not only a blatant lie, but it gravely neglects to give recognition to the scientific contributions that have been made by other civilizations throughout the world and throughout history. By asking for science to be ‘reset’, the student inadvertently admits that science is objectively measured. She is merely asking for science to be viewed with an African lens. What this lens is supposed to see remains unclear, much like how the world would be without subscribing to the scientific method of systematic observation, measurement, and testing.

“Science is true, because it is science,” to directly quote the ignorant student. This statement, in itself, is illogical; not that that would be easy to explain to this dear fellow South African student. Science does not assert that it is true. Science aims to model the world to the extent that we can make predictions and measured results which will match those predictions. That’s all science can do. If you defined “accurate predictions” as truth, then science is true.

The problem with asking for the ‘decolonization’ of science and the academia, in general, is simply that an apple falling from a tree remains a falling apple regardless of which perspective it is viewed from. Perhaps if it were a racist apple we would be having a different conversation, which some might try to argue that it is. How it is explained that this apple is falling remains objectively the same. The type of fruit that is falling and from where it is falling is open for interpretation. Few would argue against the various yet similar viable explanations for gravity (for example), but the Newtonian version no doubt was more readily able to be read, spoken about, and shared. No person would argue that Newton and Newton alone knew and understood gravity. This remains the whole point of objective science. A theory is merely the most likely scenario given known facts, until a new and better proven and measured theory replaces it.

The practical suggestions that are made in the video to ‘decolonize’ the sciences include doing away with science entirely, and starting from scratch. The different science that she hopes to achieve by ‘decolonizing’, remains unclear. There exist no perspectives on science. Science does not have context. The application of science, on the other hand, has various uses and various different avenues in which it can take place.

Lastly, and quite possibly the most important point of rebuttal, is that the notion of a homogeneous Europe is erroneous and ahistorical. Europe existed as a fractured and vast area of various cultures and societies that had the tendency to make war with each other. Greek mathematics and late German physics assimilated into what the student calls “Western education”. This, by itself, points to cross-cultural integration and further building upon established knowledge.

On a personal note, this video is, at a certain level, extremely frightening. The continued disregard of objective truths by many leftish commentators remains one of the biggest threats to our society. The only ray of light that remains is summed up in a frequently used quote by American author and orator Ben Shapiro: “Facts do not care about your feelings”. And, might I add, facts do not care about context or personal experiences.

Author: Daniël is a final year law student at the University of Pretoria and seeks to pursue an LLM degree in Constitutional law. He is the co-founder of the Tuks Leadership and Individual Program and the UP Debatsvereniging. An avid debater and orator, Daniël has coached numerous debating teams. He has a keen interest in the liberty movement and hopes to advance the values of freedom of expression, a free market, and freedom of religion in South Africa. He is a firm Gladstonian liberalist and a proponent of the rule of law. As a political enthusiast and social commentator he has been involved with various programmes and organizations as a student leader.

Daniël Eloff is a staff writer at the Rational Standard and a final year law student at the University of Pretoria. On completion of his undergraduate degree, he will pursue an LLM degree in Constitutional Law in 2017. He is a co-founder of the Tuks Leadership and Individual Program and the UP Debatsvereniging and has also served on the executives of the UP Moot Society and TuksVillage. He is an avid debater and orator and has coached numerous debating teams. Daniël has a keen interest in the liberty movement as well as politics, economics and social issues. In addition to writing for the Rational Standard, Daniël has also been published on Maroela Media as well as some student papers and media.